Author: omarpassons

Time with my mom: Reflections on senior care (pt. 2)

Time with my mom: Reflections on senior care (pt. 2)

If you haven’t read part I of this series, please read that here.

My mom and I pulled up to the hotel valet entrance and the experience of just getting from the car to the hotel room we’d share for the next couple days was as challenging a process as I’d experienced getting her ready to leave her care facility.  There is just so much stuff.  To be clear, nothing I write is a complaint. Even the things that sound like complaints aren’t really.  This woman rushed me to the hospital when I fell out of a tree and needed 20 stitches as a 3 year old.  She moved me to a school with more diversity and educational opportunity when I was 7 even though she really didn’t understand the full magnitude of either of those things. She was there at every turn to teach me, to scold me, and most importantly to me as a kid who watched foster brothers and sisters come and go sometimes weekly, she was there to love me.  So when I share the events of this weekend, even the hard ones, they really aren’t complaints in the normal sense. Read More

Time with my mom: Reflections on senior care (pt. 1 of 3)

Time with my mom: Reflections on senior care (pt. 1 of 3)

This is part I of a three-part series about senior support and caring for a parent

I pulled up to the adult care home where my 85-year old mom lives to take her out for the weekend and spend some time together. We don’t live in the same state for a variety of reasons that center mostly around California’s abhorrent lack of support for low-income seniors and the people who care for them. But I decided to put these political conversations away for a weekend as I walked into her building, turned the corner down the hall to her room, and opened her door…and what I saw was a punch in the gut that started a roller coaster of emotional highs and lows.   Read More

A word about Scooter laws in San Diego

A word about Scooter laws in San Diego

I love riding the new scooters. I also love safely walking, and riding my bike (and, technically, also tolerate having to drive). The scooter laws are important for safety and we’d all be better off if more people even knew what they were. As of August 24, 2018, when I published this, you can get up to $250 fine for:

1 – Riding on sidewalks (use the bike lanes – carefully)

2 – Riding more than one person on a scooter

3 – Riding under age 16 OR without a license

4 – Riding without a helmet**

NOTE: It is irresponsible to block sidewalks and access ways with your scooter. Please encourage your friends not to be lazy and go the extra few feet to find a responsible place for them. We’ll all benefit.

**This one is illegal, but there is a pending bill in the California state legislature to change it. That said, you can pick up a helmet for $1.99 if you have a credit card directly from the Bird App – I did, it was super easy.

The image below was added to the initial app screen on about 8/22/18. It requires users to swipe through information that includes the things I mentioned above (except the fine amount). Good job, Bird.

Please share this with your friends and neighbors and encourage your local elected officials to include a notice in those little bulletins they all send out. Also, there will be some people who want to check my work, so to speak. You can find the California Vehicle Code section HERE and the San Diego Municipal Code section HERE.  You can (and should) also write your Councilmembers to share your perspective. Get their emails HERE.

Thanks for reading!

A Torrey Named Lee: Mr. Sawyer, wisdom, and La Jolla Country Day School

A Torrey Named Lee: Mr. Sawyer, wisdom, and La Jolla Country Day School

A couple weeks ago I was invited to be a part of the Human Library Project at La Jolla Country Day School. The basic premise is that students get a chance to check out human “books,” or guests who share their stories and answer questions to help the students expand their horizons.  I talked about my maternal grandmother Henrietta, about the sliver of difference between slavery and the $234 she earned in 1940 – ALL of 1940 – and about the generational impact of racial segregation. But the most important thing that happened to me was the 15 minutes I spent with the type of man this world needs more of. Let me tell you about Lee Sawyer. Read More

On being ashy

On being ashy

I have had the good fortune to speak with students at the Preuss School, as well as through the Aaron Price Fellows program, at La Jolla Country Day School, with the Blue Heart Foundation, and a few others over the last 15 months.  With the presence of bullying, of school violence, and the general difficulties of youth that always seem present, I have found myself sharing a story to help young people remember empathy. It’s a story about being ashy. Read More

Thoughts about Live Well Center – complex issues and transparency

Thoughts about Live Well Center – complex issues and transparency

The County of San Diego has a Live Well framework that it employs to guide an approach to improving the quality of life of San Diego residents.  There is a great deal of information about the framework on the County’s site here, but this post is specifically about the proposed Live Well center location in Southeastern San Diego, the process for moving forward, and the elements that will need meaningful attention and community participation to ensure local voices are heard and embraced in the leadership and development of the region’s future. Read More

Economic prosperity and inclusion: the County’s role (part 2 of 2)

Economic prosperity and inclusion: the County’s role (part 2 of 2)

In part 1 of this series, I covered the County’s role in protecting and promoting the community’s health and the connection between health and wealth.  You can read that here.  While it is a nice benefit of this approach that taxpayers will spend less money on health and social service programs as the health and economic prosperity of our community grows, there is another reason the County can and must take a bigger leadership role in the area of economic inclusion. That is the subject of this post. Read More

Hiring a homeless person – and learning

Hiring a homeless person – and learning

Homelessness is a major issue in our community. Early this year, my campaign released our Hope4Homeless plan to provide greater County leadership around tackling homelessness.  We sat down with policy experts, homeless youth, front line service providers, and did quite a bit of research. Add that to my own experience serving Rachel’s Women’s Center as part of Catholic Charities Homeless Women’s Services Advisory Committee several years ago and a healthy amount of journalism from Kelly Davis, Kelly Bennett-Heyd, David Garrick, Lisa Halverstadt and a few other journalists and we feel good that we’d spent meaningful time understanding before writing. Then this other thing happened. Read More

New Orleans Style Fun AND Civic Engagement: March to Vote (5/19)

New Orleans Style Fun AND Civic Engagement: March to Vote (5/19)

On Saturday, May 19th, Team Passons is making sure we all have a bit of fun with our electoral politics! Come out and join us as we “Second Line” our way through the March to Vote! A Second Line is a New Orleans tradition that you can read about here. But basically we are going to dance down the street with a big brass band doing its thing and anyone who wants to can join in the fun!  Bring your mail ballots so you can vote when we march to the endpoint – the post office!

The Basics

March to Vote starts at 10:00 a.m. on Saturday (5/19) at the IRS building downtown – 801 Front Street. We aren’t organizing the march, but we are bringing the fun! Join Euphoria Brass Band, Crew D’Etat, and a bunch of fun people to remind us that while marching has a serious purpose we can also mix in some fun!

March to Vote Facebook Event Page

After Party

Because the fun shouldn’t stop, we are going afterwards up to a South Park institution that has been the scene of many a political meet-up and forum (as well as several wedding receptions, wonderful memories with friends, and neighbor connections). Join us at Whistle Stop Bar (for those over 21) to keep the fun going from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Help us Fund the fun – Donate!

To RSVP to either event with Team Passons, email melissa@omarpassons.com

Or just show up!

Oh, here is Euphoria doing its thing!